Regions of Italy


Lombardia

Lombardia

One of Italy’s largest regions, Lombardy lies in the north of the country, sharing a border with Switzerland. Stretching from the Alps to the lowlands of the Po Valley, it is home to a wide range of landscapes, including the breathtaking mountain chain that boasts the Valchiavenna, Valtellina and the Camonica Valley. Winter sports enthusiasts will find no lack of state-of-the-art facilities in Lombardy, for example in the extremely popular resorts of Tonale, Bormio, Livigno and Madesimo.

Another aspect that defines the region is its expanse of rolling hills that encompass the distinctive Franciacorta area, famous for its vineyards and wine production. The charm of the great lakes is a great tourist draw, attracting visitors to Sirmione and other well known destinations dotting the western coast of Lake Garda, while Lake Como and Lake Maggiore are no less beautiful, surrounded as they are by stately homes, parks and picturesque small towns.

The region is also characterized by the great flat tracts of the Po Valley lowlands, covered by shimmering mirrors of water and rice paddies: this is the typical landscape of Lomellina, the land of rice harvesters, steeped in tradition. The region has countless other distinctive facets. Lombardy, aided by its geographic position and fertile soil, will captivate you - nature, history, art and culture marry in harmony with innovation, technology, fashion, entertainment, and a contemporary outlook.

The region comprises the provinces of Bergamo, Brescia, Como, Cremona, Lecco, Lodi, Mantua, Milan (regional capital), Monza and Brianza, Pavia, Sondrio and Varese.

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